Police Department Public Safety: Commissioner John J. Montillo Jr., Director

Police Department

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Project Medicine Drop

The Lyndhurst Police Department, under the direction of Public Safety Commissioner John Montillo Jr. and Chief James O'Connor, has joined the New Jersey Attorney General's "Project Medicine Drop" initiative. A Project Medicine Drop box has been installed at police headquarters at 367 Valley Brook Avenue, Lyndhurst.

Residents may visit the Lyndhurst Police Department at any time, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, to dispose of their unused or excess medications. Members of the public are invited to visit the Project Medicine Drop sites and drop off any unused prescription medications anonymously and with no questions asked.

More information about Project Medicine Drop, including the full list of Project Medicine Drop locations, can be found at NJConsumerAffairs.gov. For more information about the drop box located at the Lyndhurst Police Department please contact (201) 939-2900 ext. 2740.


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2015 Crackdown- Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over Campaign

The LYNDHURST POLICE DEPARTMENT Will Be Out in Full Force to
Catch Drunk Drivers

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over

As summer winds down, the Lyndhurst Police Department is ramping up its enforcement efforts as part of a national crackdown on drunk driving. The 20-day, high-visibility campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, is a partnership with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to curb impaired driving and save lives. August 21-September 7 (Labor Day), law enforcement partners nationwide will show zero tolerance for drunk driving. Increased state and national messaging about the dangers of driving drunk, coupled with checkpoints and increased officers on the road, aim to drastically reduce the toll of drunk driving.

 

And what a toll it is. In 2013, there were 10,076 people killed in drunk–driving crashes, almost a third of all traffic fatalities. Thirty-eight percent of crash fatalities on Labor Day weekend that year involved drunk drivers (with blood alcohol concentrations [BACs] of .08 or higher), amounting to 161 lives lost. And we’re not just talking about a little bit of alcohol, either. More than a quarter (27%) of the crash fatalities that occurred on Labor Day weekend involved drivers with BACs of .15 or higher—almost twice the illegal per se limit.

Chief O’Connor emphasized the preventable nature of drunk driving: “All it takes is a little planning ahead. Designate a sober driver or call a cab. But whatever you do, don’t drink and drive.” NHTSA has made it even easier to get home safely when you’ve been drinking. The new SaferRide mobile app (free from the iTunes store and Google Play), can help users call a taxi or a friend for a ride home. The app can even help you identify your location so you can be picked up. So this August and year-round, remember that there’s no excuse for drunk driving. If you choose to break the law, police will see you before you see them.
Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.